Archives for category: Landfill

Recycler Finder is the first online and mobile application that makes finding a recycling facility fun and easy. Check out their website below:

recycler_finder

 Another great Green article from Green Halo
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Green Halo - World's Biggest DumpsAfrica is home to some beautiful sites…and then there’s Agbogbloshie, Ghana. The town has one of the world’s largest dumps for discarded electronics. Millions of tons of used electronics from all over the world – including the U.S. – are sent to Africa to be re-sold or donated to charity. But much of it is broken or obsolete and winds up in Agbogbloshie. The old electronics are often smashed by scavengers looking for valuable metals inside, such as copper. Back in the U.S., the Puente Hills landfill in Los Angeles County, California, has piles of trash reaching as high as a 40-story building. The landfill, which was the largest in the country, closed this past October after more than 50 years in operation because it reached capacity – about 130 million tons of trash. The landfill will be sealed with a layer of dirt and eventually turned into a park. But the largest trash dump in the world isn’t actually on land – it’s in the Pacific Ocean. Trash thrown into the Pacific is carried by currents to an area north of Hawaii. This floating trash pile is now estimated to be larger in area than the state of Texas. Several private organizations are working to clean it up, which is difficult because of its size and remote location. The good news is that the city of Oslo, Norway has a use for some of that ocean trash: converting it to heat and electricity by burning it. The Norwegians are such good recyclers that they often run out of trash to burn and must import it from other countries. Kudos to the Norwegians for doing their part to prevent Africa – and the rest of the world – from becoming one giant trash heap.

Yahoo News Video:
http://news.yahoo.com/video/whoknew-worlds-biggest-dumps-060000314.html

Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
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In a permanent extension of a 2007 law, San Francisco has made it illegal for the City to buy or distribute plastic water bottles. Bottled water contributes to massive amounts of litter and plastic waste all over the world. San Francisco has an aggressive plan to achieve zero net waste by 2020. In 2013, San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors appeared ready to enact one of the strictest bans on bottled water in the nation. Days ago, the proposal became law, and plastic water bottles smaller than 21 ounces will no longer be allowed on city property starting Oct. 1, 2014.

Green Halo - San Francisco Bans Bottled Water on City PropertySan Francisco’s legislation, introduced by Supervisor David Chiu, “does not prohibit private business from trading in small plastic bottles of water.” Rather, it restricts the sale at events of more than 100 people (not including marathons and other sporting events), and on all city property and parks. San Francisco Airport will also be allowed to sell plastic bottles indefinitely.

San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors supported the legislation unanimously. Prior to the vote, Chiu held up a water bottle that was a quarter of the way filled with oil. The move illustrated just how much oil is used in the production and transport of plastic water bottles.

“He also reminded San Franciscans that the current fad of buying bottled water only started in the 1990s when the bottled water industry mounted a huge ad campaign that got Americans buying bottled water,” reports the San Francisco Bay Guardian. “Somehow, Chiu noted, ‘for centuries, everybody managed to stay hydrated.’ He, and the rest of San Francisco seem confident that they can learn to do so again.

Not surprisingly, the American Beverage Association and bottled water industry were less than enthusiastic about the bottled water ban. These critics claim that banning bottled water at concerts and other large events will drive them to choose alcohol or carbonated beverages instead of healthier water.

Learn more about this new legislation here.

Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
Follow Green Halo on Twitter at http://twitter.com/greenhalousa

We all want to prevent waste – in our daily lives and on more substantial levels. Diverting waste, being environmentally friendly, and being efficient with time, money, and resources: these are important goals. And that’s what green construction is all about.

Green construction includes diverting waste at construction sites as well as over the life time of a building. Green companies don’t just think about the immediate impact today, they also consider what impact is made tomorrow. There are many factors such as waste prevention, government mandates, cost effectiveness, materials used, constructing methods, environmental threats and more that form the Green Building sector.

Many architects and builders are interested in sustainability and “going green.” It’s rare to find an architect who specializes in green building and also has the necessary background and experience that goes along with the title of being eco-friendly.

Green Halo - Green Planet Architects Website that Connects Green Building Professionals

With the launch of Green Planet Architects those in the sustainability and development sector can connect with one another through the first international network of sustainable architects. The site prides itself in empowering those who prefer to go the eco-minded route, while also making this planet a greener place for all of us to enjoy!

Don’t forget to visit our website to see how you can recycle today’s resources for tomorrow’s generations!
Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
Follow Green Halo on Twitter at http://twitter.com/greenhalousa

San Francisco wants to encourage more clothing donations in an effort to eliminate unneeded waste in its landfills. As part of their mission to entice more residents to donate clothes, the city’s Department of Environment is launching a line of friendlier, networked textile recycling bins. Frog Designs and Goodwill teamed up to develop a new, more inviting textile bin that will hopefully find their way in or around every large apartment building in San Francisco.

Green Halo Clothes Donation Bin Recycling Reuse San Francisco Goodwill

For the new textile bins, Frog threw out the old dumpster and security locker look for a simple wooden crate. Up top, the lid opens with an easy “smile-like” lip. On the side, donors will also find a QR code to easily access an online tax donation form. Meanwhile, each bin is equipped with interior sensors that signal Goodwill trucks when it’s time for a pickup, so they never overflow with clothes.

According to Fast CoExist, 39 million pounds of textiles end up in San Francisco landfills. It’s tricky to recycle clothes since textiles are made up of so many different materials. I:CO, a company that specializes in sorting through old textiles, said it uses 400 different criteria to sort through the waste alone.

With the new bins in place the city hopes to catch all the linens that normally slip through the cracks like socks and shower curtains. After collecting the donations, the city will go through the clothes, some of which will be sent to the resale market, recycled into textile products, or broken back down into fibers for products like insulation. Frog and Goodwill have also partnered with retailers like Levis and H&M not only to put bins in their stores, but also to help market recycling to customers.

Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
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For eco-conscious types, recycling as much as possible is a no-brainer. However, many people mistakenly believe that a pizza box can be recycled right next to newspapers, printer paper, and regular cardboard boxes.

While pizza boxes usually do bear a recycling symbol, indicating that they are recyclable, this labeling does not take into account the greasy blotches and cheese smears that almost certainly linger on any used box. Usually made from corrugated cardboard, unused or clean boxes are perfectly fine to be recycled, but the food residue that lingers on most used pizza boxes makes them unsuitable to be recycled whole.These food residues can actually contaminate whole batches of the recycling process by causing spoilage or damaging equipment not meant to come into contact with oils. Therefore, putting boxes with food residue into the recycles can actually cause more harm than good.Parts of boxes that are free of oil or grease marks are okay to be recycled, as long as care is taken to ensure that they are clean and that the parts of the boxes contaminated by food residues are thrown into the trash.
Another great Green article from Green Halo.
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
Follow Green Halo on Twitter at http://twitter.com/greenhalousa