Archives for the month of: May, 2012

When people recycle, they protect the environment and prevent valuable materials from going to waste. However, it’s important to check the recycling codes on bottles, tubs, bags and other items. Proper sorting improves efficiency and reduces the operating costs of recycling facilities. Plastic manufacturers use seven different codes.

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#1 PETE/PET: Polyethyl tetraethylenei. Many beverages come in plastic bottles of this type. If your city doesn’t accept these bottles, you may be able to bring them to a redemption center.

#2 HDPE: High-density polyethylene. Manufacturers often use this plastic for rigid containers. Most recycling programs accept this type. You may have to recycle number two plastic bags at a grocery store.

#3 PVC/V: Polyvinyl chloride. Various chemical containers and other products contain this plastic. Only some towns and cities accept it. Remember to thoroughly rinse out any chemical residues.

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#4 LDPE/LLDPE: Low-density polyethylene or linear low-density polyethylene. This more flexible plastic is used in some bags and condiment bottles. Most cities recycle it.

#5 PP: Polypropylene. This relatively common plastic is found in some cereal bowls and containers for refrigerated foods. You might be able to recycle it in a major town or city.

#6 PS: Polystyrene. This material can come in the form of plastic or foam in disposable cups, trays and cartons. It is particularly harmful to the environment. In most areas, it must be discarded.

#7  OTHER: Unlike the other numbers, seven doesn’t refer to a specific plastic. The material may consist of multiple plastics or a less common type. Few cities recycle it.

Metal, glass and cardboard often lack code numbers. If you need to sort metals, use a magnet; it won’t stick to aluminum. A symbol with a phone number usually means that you must take the item to a special location to recycle it. Contact your local government for specific sorting guidelines.

Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
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Making money by recycling electronics is a simple task that can bring in some extra cash and get rid of those unused items just sitting around the house. This is an excellent way to go green and is great for the environment. Disposing of electronics is very important because improper disposal can be harmful to the environment. The contaminants found in electronic items are harmful materials that are not ideal for landfills.

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Many different companies are dedicated to assisting with the proper disposal of electronic waste also known e-waste. There are internet companies that specialize in collecting e-waste and will provide payment for the items sent in. Most of these websites have easy to follow instructions for the recycling process and will pay for the shipment of the e-waste. These companies are found by typing recycle electronics for money in any search engine.

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There are many steps to follow when choosing to go green with e-waste. The first step is to evaluate all the items you would like to recycle and find a company that takes each item. Research the companies and find out which is willing to pay the most for the recyclables. When researching the facility for the recycling of the e-waste, a great website is http://www.recyclerfinder.com. This site helps locate facilities around you in seconds after only entering the item to be recycled and the zip code of the individual.
Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
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Massive quantities of soap scraps go to waste every day in America. Most people throw them in the garbage, adding to the nation’s many landfills. Some are burned in trash incinerators. Other scraps go down the drain, often helping to clog the pipes. All of this waste leads to unnecessary production of hand soaps and packaging materials.

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Fortunately, a couple of nonprofit organizations are working to change this. The Global Soap Project collects scraps from American motels and uses them to manufacture new soaps. It gives the new bars to poor people, primarily in African countries. This green recycling process both benefits the environment and protects people from diseases.

Clean the World is a similar recycling organization. It obtains scraps from hotels and manufacturers. CTW also holds local collection drives in various parts of the country. This green nonprofit helps people in 45 nations, including Honduras. It supplies free products to American homeless shelters as well. CTW is based in Orlando, Florida.

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There are several different ways to help these organizations recycle soap. Anyone may volunteer or donate cash. An alternative is to start a local collection drive in cooperation with Clean the World. Motel and inn owners can aid these organizations by collecting and donating scraps from their guest rooms.

People also have the option to collect their own scraps and recycle them into new bars. Although this won’t help people in poor countries, it does save money and benefit the environment.

Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
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Processed orange juice is convenient and relatively good for you, but it harms the environment in many ways. Here are some of the reasons why processed juices aren’t green:

1. Fuel: Manufacturers often transport orange juice hundreds or thousands of miles. The oranges or concentrate may come from Canada, Brazil or another country.

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2. Packaging: Most processed juices come in plastic or cardboard packages. Many people don’t recycle the containers, and they end up in landfills or incinerators. Plastic production requires oil and leads to additional drilling. Cardboard harms the environment through increased logging.

3. Water: It takes 44.2 gallons of water to produce one cup of processed orange juice, according to the Sydney Morning Herald. One reason is that evaporation is required to concentrate juices.

4. Pesticide: Compared to most other foods, farmers use more pesticide and fungicide to grow oranges. Pesticides often cause unintended harm to animals and insects that do not threaten crops.

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Sometimes they also find their way into fruit juices. Traces of fungicide were found in products from Brazil during December 2011, according to Bloomberg News. Studies have found that this type of fungicide may cause liver tumors in animals.

These practices damage the environment by promoting extinction, pollution and desertification. This is unsustainable, and it may eventually harm the orange growers as well. Fortunately, there are some relatively green ways to make or obtain fruit juices:

A. Buy oranges and make your own. If possible, compost the peels.

B. Purchase it in a large container that you can easily recycle.

C. To reduce pesticide and fuel use, obtain organic or local products.

Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
Follow Green Halo on Twitter at http://twitter.com/greenhalousa

A landfill can adversely affect the property values of the homes in the area and the health of the residents who live in the community. It also has a negative impact on the environment. Although landfills are relatively easy to locate on an Internet search or map, many people do not think about the surrounding area before moving into a home. In addition, residents often have no control over a new landfill being built or an existing one expanding close to their home. Sometimes, people only discover that they live close to a waste management facility after they become chronically ill.

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One of the best ways to minimize the toxic effects of pollution on people and the environment is to recycle more and refrain from contributing to the amount of waste that gets thrown out. In many cases, people automatically throw things away because they don’t know where to find a recycling facility, or they are not aware of everything that can be reused or recycled. There are so many items that can be reused or re-purposed now, and the Internet is filled with creative ideas on how to do this. People can also use http://RecyclerFinder.com as a resource for locating recycling facilities in their area. When more items are recycled, both the population and the environment enjoy the benefits.

Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
Follow Green Halo on Twitter at http://twitter.com/greenhalousa

The detrimental health effects of cigarettes in relation to the body of a smoker are well known, and are actually printed on most advertising and packaging. There is even research that suggests the smoke that is exhaled can have adverse health effects on people, children, and pets that are in the immediate area. One area that is not often considered, however, is the environmental impact that the entire process of smoking has on the planet and its population.

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The amount of resources that are spent in order to produce a pack of cigarettes is much higher than some other products. The agricultural methods that are used to produce tobacco use an excessive amount of water and deplete the nutrients in large areas for many years. The plants themselves sometimes have negative reactions with surrounding fields, making it impossible to integrate the crop. The genetic engineering that is involved in creating drought and disease resistant tobacco plants has also caused problems with germination in surrounding areas.

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A single cigarette requires paper that is produced from trees, and the filters are made in such a way so that when a smoker is done, the filter still contains many of the thousands of chemicals that are produced. Cigarette butts account for a large percentage of the waste from many countries and can take up to 25 years to decompose. When improperly disposed of, the butts can be consumed by animals in the environment and can cause intestinal blockages. Even after the butts have broken down into component parts, the chemicals from the treated tobacco can contaminate an area so it is unhealthy for habitation.

There are few immediate solutions for many of these problems. Campaigns to reduce or stop smoking are the most effective way to prevent damage to the environment and to people. Advanced agricultural methods can help reduce the water and energy needed to grow tobacco, and new materials can make cigarette filters that are recyclable, although without strong governmental regulations the chemicals they contain can still be harmful.

Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
Follow Green Halo on Twitter at http://twitter.com/greenhalousa

Going green is a popular way to live these days, but how far can people take their attempt to lessen their impact on the environment? While most people know that using less electricity, water and fossil fuels is a great way to help the planet, most are unaware that their choice in pets can make an impact as well.

Greener Pet Choices

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The first thing to note when deciding on a green pet choice is that the population of dogs and cats in the United States is out of control. A step toward a greener pet is to choose an older dog or cat to discourage the intentional breeding of animals for commercial purposes. Breeding cats and dogs simply fuels the overpopulation of these animals, while adopting a pet is almost like a form of recycling.

A benefit of owning a dog or cat is that their feces can be used for compost. In turn, the compost can be used to grow food for pets.

Environmentally-friendly Pet Supplies

Companies that embrace recycled materials for use in their products are the best option. Consumers should choose a company that only uses recycled, sustainable materials in its products.

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Some examples of unique green products for pets include a cat toilet that eliminates the need for cat litter waste, pesticide-free grooming products that are safer for use on animals and around humans and hemp collars that are more comfortable for animals to wear regularly.

Pet owners can help the environment even more by recycling pet products after use.

Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
Follow Green Halo on Twitter at http://twitter.com/greenhalousa

Electric cars may be gaining popularity because of fuel savings and a reduced impact on the environment, but the type of battery typically used in these cars could pose a problem if not properly recycled. Not only is having a recycling program for batteries from electric cars good for the environment, but it helps consumers avoid some safety issues associated with battery disposal.

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Safety Issues

The first consideration regarding an electric car battery is that it typically weighs about 550 pounds. This obviously poses a problem when the average driver is attempting to dispose of such a large item. A recycling program would allow consumers to take their used batteries to a place where the battery would be handled using the appropriate lifting equipment.

Much of the energy contained in the battery remains there even after the battery can no longer be used to power a vehicle. A safety hazard is posed by this storage of unused energy. Electric shock from the leftover charge may injure a person, and there is a significant fire risk.

Established Used Electric Car Battery Programs

There are some car companies that have already partnered with recyclers to allow consumers to recycle an electric car battery.

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Toxco operates a plant in Canada that specializes in using state-of-the-art technology to recycle lithium-ion batteries.

In Europe, car manufacturer Tesla has established its own program for allowing consumers to recycle a spent battery from an electric vehicle.

Toyota allows Prius owners to take the battery to the dealership to be recycled.

How To Recycle a Used Electric Vehicle Battery

Consumers should start by consulting the owner s manual for their electric vehicle. Details on how to recycle a spent battery is likely to be found somewhere in the manual. If no information can be found, call a customer service representative.

Consumers can also contact a local recycling plant for a referral to a facility that can handle a large lithium-ion battery.

The bottom line is that electric cars cannot be considered fully green unless the manufacturer has established a way for consumers to recycle the battery.

Another great Green article from Green Halo
Track your recycling at www.greenhalosystems.com
Follow Green Halo on Twitter at http://twitter.com/greenhalousa